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« Bank Managers, Staff Fired For Alleged Misappropriation | Main | Unproductive CDC Managers To Lose Jobs »

Monday, 20 December 2004

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AGBOR NKONGHO

Barrister Ajong,
I am really proud of you. We need lawyers like you in our society who fight for the oppress, downtrodden and the marginalize. You are following the footsteps of the famous Nigerian legal icon Gani Fawehimi. It's not going to be easy but as a friend, brother and colleague I will advise you not to give up the battle. It's now time for you to put into practice the lofty goals you set when you were at the Nigerian Law School. You promise to be at the vanguard for the fight against oppression and human rights violation in all its ramification. This is now your baptism of fire. I can always count on you. You make me proud. Always use the legal profession as a means to fight for justice and equality and to act as the voice of the voiceless.Perhaps through your action the profession can wake up from its lethargy. Kudos and more grease
Barrister Felix Agbor Nkongho
Brussels
belgium

leke Alex

Me Ajong
Actually as I was reading through the article, I saw many anglophones cameroonians. Thank God people like you are there to let them know hope is in the horizon and that one day things would change. Me keep up

Andrew Edimo

Dear Barrister Ajong,
Thank for standing up against the diabolic design of depriving the English speaking people in Cameroon of university education.
Life is not only about acquiring wealth. It always about the impact you make in the society in which you live. Come what may, this move of yours is going to make a big difference for the English speaking people in the triangle call Cameroon.
I hope other lawyers will follow your line of action and stand up for poor, such as the poor parents in Tiko who have buy water which is a basic necessity that the council has to provide, the oroko people who were moved from the way of life in korup national park and abadoned or the thousands of cameroonians who contributed money for the support of the national football team in their world cup bid in USA it embezzled by group people in the govrnment.
God has a reason for make you take up such a venture and He is surely going to guide through.

My heart goes to you for your courage, vision, sense of purpose and selflessness.
God bless you.

Sammy Ndingi

This is wonderful news that I cannot afford to miss commenting! If all Lawyers in Cameroon were courageous like you Lawyer Ajong, and the Ebong's, then I think the judiciary would get its place oneday in Cameroon. But I wonder how far this case would not be frustrated and misled by Cameroonian Lawyers in the name of Magistrates and judges. My advise would be that since tough battles like this easily get frustrated by the so-called judges, there is the need for a strong and united force among learned colleagues. Lawyer Ajong should therefore work ceaselessly with other learned colleagues like Njeualem who are in supoport of him and others so that justice should not be stolen in this affair.

I believe from your action, that advocacy would find it's place in West Cameroon oneday. Kudos!!!!

charles Taku

I must add my voice to that of many who see in this effort an attempt to save our children from the plight in whch we have been placed for over 45 years now.
This courageous attempt by the two learned lawyers, Barristers Ajong and Njualem has touched the nerve centre of two important victims of our collective enslavement, namely the devaluation of our educational system and the legal system.
We are watching the outcome of this case .
Even if they lose as the oppressor and crime syndicate that colonises our territory will surely ensure, their efforts effectively sensitises the world to our plight in this dungeon called La Republique du Cameroun.
Let all men and women of good will give these two great legal luminaries all the support and encouragement they are due.
History will record that they filed this case and never again therefater will a people submit to themselves to the type of abuses this case intends to redress.
This is just the begining. More is still to come.
Let the courts beware.
Chief Charles Fuatabong Achaleke Taku
Arusha Tanzania.

Glenn Wilson

These same courts, These same Judges. One day they shall learn. Good luck Barrister Ajong. There are many closely watching the actions and decisions of this court. Seasons greetings and best wishes for 2005 to my Cameroonian friends. Glenn Wilson.

Glenn William Wilson
Australian Passport – L6641600
www.angelfire.com/dc2/glenn
Phone: (61) 400032023
8th November 2004
glennwwilson@bigpond.com
His Excellency, Mr. Paul Biya
President Of Cameroon, Africa.
Unity Palace, Yaounde.


Dear Mr. President,
Petition

SUBJECT:
“ Requesting that His Excellency, Paul Biya, in his capacity as the President of Cameroon’s “Higher Judicial Council” intervene in case no: HCF/23/MC/2000-2001, currently being heard in the Fako High Court”.


INTRODUCTION:

My name is Glenn Wilson, an Australian citizen. I was a resident in Cameroon from April 2001 – May 2003, holding resident permit no: 102148412. I currently reside in Sydney, Australia.


FACTS

Between 23 May 01 & 25 July 01, 46.5 million cfa (transferred from Australia) was invested in Cameroon, creating jobs and business opportunities for Cameroonians. In a scam involving SGBC Bank, my Cameroonian wife of four months poisoned me with the intention of stealing my assets. Members of the Ejagham/Bayangi tribe, known as the Mamfe Mafia, contrived the matter. These criminals sought the assistance of the Cameroon Judiciary to assist in their crimes. To this point, three years and over 50 court appearances later, the Judiciary continue to be willing & active conspirators.

OBSERVATION

The matter now before the Fako High Court has become so enmeshed in corruption, involving High & Appeal Court Judges, that it is beyond their capacity to act in a correct Judicial manner. Two previous petitions to the Cameroon Minister of Justice (Dated 10/07/02 & 20/04/03) have brought no response. This complete breakdown of the Cameroon Judiciary shall ring alarm bells to potential investors. That this Nigerian style 419-scam can operate with the full knowledge and assistance of the Cameroon Judiciary, bears witness to the difficulties even Multi National companies suffer once their investments are in place.

REACTION & CONSEQUENCE

This type of corruption causes great harm and dismay to the general population of Cameroon, when those in positions of trust and responsibility act like conscienceless thieves and concern themselves only with their own self interest. Corruption in this matter leads as high as the Office of the Prime Minister of Cameroon. In the interest of transparency in this matter, I am willing to give testimony and provide evidence to you concerning the criminal and corrupt actions of those listed below.

-Société Generale De Banques Au Cameroun.
-Justice J. F. Fonkwe - Fako Appeals Court Judge.
-Justice A. K. Nana - Fako Appeals Court Judge.
-Justice Lebong Morfaw Chibili - Fako High Court Judge.
-Magistrate Ketuanze Jacob – Limbe Deputy State Council.
-Barrister Eno Charles Agbor – Eno Law Chambers, Buea.
-Barrister Tanyi Mbianyor – Eno Law Chambers, Buea.
-Barrister Mbi – Solomon Chambers, Kumba.
-Chief Bisong Etahoben – Weekly Post editor.
-Chief of Territorial Surveillance, Buea.


CONCLUSION

This collusion of Cameroon Banks & the Courts, (plus an endless supply of forged documents) to steal investor’s assets, can only be seen as Cameroon being a hostile environment for any investor.
I humbly request that with your intervention, this matter can be brought to a speedy conclusion, thus saving any further escalation in a matter that has so far, surpassed believability.

Yours Sincerely,


Glenn W Wilson.


C/C List

- Minister of Justice, Cameroon.
- Secretary General in the Presidency, Yaounde
- Australian Foreign Affairs, Canberra.
- International Court of Justice, The Hague.
- World Bank Headquarters, Washington D.C.
- International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C.
- Western Union, Corporate Headquarters.
- Société Generale, France.
- Société Generale de Banque au Cameroun, H.Q.
- African Development Bank H.Q.
- International Finance Corporation, Washington D.C.
- British Foreign & Commonwealth Office, London.
- American Embassy, Yaounde.
- Transparency International.


Martin Douala

And the case should include a clause declaring willful misconduct on the part of UB authority and a requirement to compensate Anglophone students who bought forms but failed the GCE A/L Exams. It puts into light the decision making capability of policy makers at UB.

This lawsuit is most welcome.

Martin Douala

JB Samba

This is just wonderful. With lawyers of the likes of Barrister Ojong, CMR justice system will one day see the light of day. Thank you barrister Ojong for the wonderful gesture. I hope other learned Ladies and gentlemen of the noble profession should also joing the cue and lead the oppressed in CMR to a free society wherein there is no victimisation. In fact anybody, I mean any Judge who thinks that Barrister Ojong has no case is an enemy to all anglophones and anglophone progress,

Francophones and Equatoguineans admitted into UB are far more unqualified than even aongophones with 3 Es at the A'levels and a fail in English at the O'levels. In the early years of UB examination fraud was far fetched. With the influx of francophones, examination malpractice is the talk of the day in UB. This is an alert that UB should remodel its admission procedures to create a level ground for all actors in the game.
It's either THE GCE O'LEVEL ENGLISH LANGUAGE IS THE PREREQUISITE FOR EVERY APPLICANT or UB SHOULD PUT IN PLACE ANOTHER ENGLISH PROFICIENCY EXAM THAT EVERY APPLICANT MUST PASS FOR THEIR APPLICATION PACKAGES CAN BE PROCESSED (The likes of TOEFL) If UB cannot do this, the the admission procedure will never be fare for all applicants.

J. B. Samba
New York

FRANCIS.

I am quite proud to hear about this. I wish many other people could react the way you have just done , Barrister Ajong. I pray that God should give you power to fight for the freedom of Anglophone students.
More power to your elbow.

NDI MANJONG

Ajong (Esq.) singlehandedly is confronting a matter related to the tinkering with the GCE by the current GCE Board as concerns GCE language requirements; which requirements are likely to further disadvantaged Anglophone students. The SCNC has never taken up the GCE language requirements past Mr. Feko's letter of observation to Dr. Yembe. Those who sacrificed to see that GCE Board created, can in Lawyer Ajong's example find an Anglophone still standing and ready to defend an interest that is worth defending.
NDI MANJONG (Massachusetts, USA).

Joseph Nkeze

Congratulations Ajong and Njualem for continuing the fight that many anglophones started many years ago. The situation with the University of Buea is a pretty distressing one. Intimidation, corruption, and neo-patrimonialism reign supreme. It starts from the Chancellor, lording over professors, when there is no term paper to her credit. It is a situation where mediocrity is encouraged and hailed. Those who raise genuine questions about her leadership style are routinely purged, and ridiculed.
Mrs Dorothy Limunga Njeuma owes the francophone leadership her allegiance, that is why she has watered down the admission rules in their favor. Obiang Nguema and associates are pumping their new oil wealth by sending children of their cronies to college so that they can learn the english language and be able to work with the Americans at the oil rigs. The recent article in the Washington Post was an eye-opener. Who knows how much they are spending in lining the pockets of these people. If they can do it in the U.S. which has strong anti-corruption laws, they can do it anywhere.
I have always been of the opinion that fighting the University of Buea needs a holistic approach. The lawyers, the civil servants, students' organizations, church.... and the courts?
Former Governor Oben Ashu used to ignore the courts. Many Administrators simply ignore the decisions of the courts. They snub at such irritant, and embark on political missions to rid such magistrates from the bench. It is a good thing, using the same instrument of opression to fight opression. Gone are the days of injunctions, and other court orders, respected by the administrators. Today, the court system has become a business venture for the highest bidder. Maybe, I am too pessimistic, but i will be waiting anxiously for the court decision. Maybe, after the court ruling, we can begin the real fight to prevent the Anglophone educational system from being plunged into the abyss, and the bottomless pit of history.

Genesis B. USA

It is but obvious that Anglophones in Cameroon are victims of circumstances of any kind. To the best of my knowledge, the language of instruction in the University of Buea is English. An Anglophone with an A/L certificate must have had English as his/her language of instruction for at least 10 years. It is therefore unlogical to deprive a child of a university education for which he/she is qualified just because he cannot present an O/L certificate in English. Admit the students and put them on an English placement test. If they cannot make it, let them take a basic language course (Basic English) rather than sending them to the jungle in the name of French Universities where most Anglophone students are compelled to register a negative impression about university studies and leave fully frustrated and with no hope or zeal of ever sitting on a bench again. Frankly speaking, a Francophone who is already admitted into UB cannot stand the strength of the O/L English. Check this out! So why should Anglophones be super English students before getting into UB. Note that the language requirement is only to help one understand his/her class lectures, be able to do the assignments and write the exams in the required language. Any Anglophone who is an A/L holder and has had all his/her education in English cannot fall nelow this level. To me, such a student is qualified to get into UB if the grades are OK. I wonder if a student who had all his/her secondary and high school studies in English but had failed O/L English and is in UB could go to a student after a lecture with his notes to be translated. They could ask Anglophones who intend to major in English to present an O/L certificate in English and not all Anglophones (English speakers) . It is an exaggeration on the part of the so call Vice chancellor. Why can she not stop for a moment and think about the future of Anglophones’ education. Yes, that has forced most students like some of us to be braindrained. We were rejected back home but yet we become corner stones in a strange country. Then what happens to a whole lot that do not have any other option? After all, none of her children, family member will fail to attend UB because of such a requirement. So it does not mean anything to her whether it is good or bad policy. I hear she is a super woman. Yes, she should be a super woman of both wisdom and compassion or else the Anglophone education system will be plunged in an Abyss as one brother observed.
In this light Barrister Ajong to me is God sent. I wish he fights the battle to the end. It takes a lot of wisdom and concentration to come up with such a sensitive observation and it takes passion and courage to be ready to carry it forward.
I know just as any other Cameroonian that the notoriety of Cameroonian authorities in thwarting and obstructing justice may turn this case the way none of us will expect. However, this should never discourage the visions of Barrister Ajong and others like him whom we dearly need to put things right in our beloved father land. Remember that no condition is permanent. The doom over Cameroon will one day go away. Thank God the doom is placed by people who like any other human being draw nearer to death after every second, minute, hour, day, of their lives that pass by. With this in mind we need youths of the likes of Barrister Ajong for a future and most admired Cameroon.
More power to your elbows Barrister Ajong and Njualem. God will fight the battle for you and for all of us the Anglophones.

Charles Eyong

Dear readers,

I have read the story "Lawyer Sues UB Over Admission Procedures" by Peague Managa with keen attention. While lawyers are right in making their case, I think they should do so rightly. I shall not refute the fact that UB authorities are not gold-palting admisions procedures but we should also know that falling standards is not what we yearn for.

These lawyers are people who passed the GCE O'Levels in English language, yet they think equity means giving equall access to people who cannot demonstrate knwoledge of the language of instruction. How can they be creative, imaginative, intuitive and constructive if they cannot fill in blank spaces, write a short essay, sit in for a listening and reading comprehension test? Are these not what is required of an ordinary level student? What is it that lawyers would advocate mediocrity? It sounds insensitive and insulting to drag the university to court on such grounds.

I shall buttress my argument with these points:

First, the trend of events in that country and even out here in the West is that francophones are bent on studying English and English language courses even at the Doctoral levels. Sit with most of them in a class and you will be shocked by their brilliant performances. Should this happen over our watch? We talk of marginalisation, yet we encourage mediocrity even at the ordinary levels. What will be our position if a professor is unable to articulate fluently in English? Are we not going to drag UB to court for dubious recruitment proceedures? Are we not going to say why should someone be recruited to teach in english without an O'levels pass in English language? Anglophones should take the challenge to themselves by passing the GCE O'levels in English language or become mean. A programme designed for non-speakers of a language cannot be open to speakers. It is out of any normal reasoning that someone who has acquired 14 years of schooling in the English language should be equated with someone who has only six months to learn English language. Students should be encouraged to pass exams at the right levels and enjoy their freedoms and rights in an anglo-saxon university. Educational reforms in every country of the world are moving from schools being hideouts of mediocrity towards centers of knowledge. If you can inform yourself that our educational systems are based on competition in which every student (despite background and learning ability) is treated thesame, then you should blame those who think they are cheated for not passing the English language at the O'levels.

I hear UB is frustrating anglophones who end up fleeing to study in Nigeria, UK, Canada and USA. That allegation should be thrown out of the court because you cannot study in any of these countries without passing an English language test. Such an allegation is too emotional and unjust in itself. UB still needs tougher English language requirements from anglophones to enable us compete in an increasingly knowledge and communication oriented economy. It is an obligation and not an option any longer.

Dear complainant, argue your case on ethnic grounds, bribery and corruption and be a hero. Otherwise take a close look at your facts and make a stronger case. You still have an opportunity to put forward a sensible case that will lay bare malpractices at that eroding centre of learning. If you cannot win your case, then spend your time on something useful and let students work hard at the right time and level.

On the issue of admissions only after GCE results are out, I think your best offer shall be a conditonal admissions offer. This agin depends on if there were no other qualified applicants than those awaiting sandwiched certificates. A mistake you make in life manifests even later on in your life. Going to study in another university solves the conjestion problem too. We need to send very strong signals to students that they should not compromise their chances by not taking every aspect of their studies seriously and ensuring that they succeed. It will be a shame, a scam if courts and not schools solve academic problems. If that should be the case, then courts should take over admissions procedures at the UB. Let me know your views.

Ambe Johnson

Hello Charles,

Here are my views: The fact that one doesn't pass english in the O/L does not mean that they are mediocre. It simply means that they are weak in that particular subject. I do agree that a certain English standard must be maintained for every UB student. However, I argue, like the lawyers, that a procedure for remediation should be applied to these students; the same remediation process offered to Francophones. In order words, if UB authorities believe that a 2-month crash course is enough for Francophones to cope with the language demands at the university, then the sam should apply to Anglophones. So let's level the playing field and have all those who do not meet the standard (anglophone or francophone)to go through the crash course and take the required tests. If they fail, they go elsewhere. If they pass, then they can become part of UB because they have taken care of their defficiencies.

The UB remedial course and test(s) should be the ultimate gauge for ALL students rather than GCE O/L English results.

JB Samba

Mr. Charles, to put it simply, you have noy understood what the arguement is all about. The english language requirement for those studying in the diaspora is either TOEFL, IELTS ...(a level play ground for everybody). Mark you that in America or the UK there is no English Language subject pass is a prerequisite to University studies.
You should also note that Cameroonians (francophones and anglophones alike) are not native English language speakers and thus should be treated as such.
You talk of tougher English langauge requirements for Anglophones. What do you have to say about francophones and Equatoguineans who are presently studying at UB and can't follow lectures properly because of english langauge barrier (they did pass the comprehensive english language exam that UB offers) meanwhile there are Angophones suffering in Francophone Universities with a better understanding of the english langauge. There will come a time (with the marginalisation of Anglophones in every setup in Cmaeroon) when Anglophones will be barred from Francophone Universities because the don't have a pass in French langauge. When that time finally comes where do you think they will go to.
As Mr Ambe has rightly put it "if UB authorities believe that a 2-month crash course is enough for Francophones (an xtension Equatoguineans) to cope with the language demands at the university, then the same should apply to Anglophones. So let's level the playing field and have all those who do not meet the standard (anglophone or francophone or foreign nationals)to go through the crash course and take the required tests. If they fail, they go elsewhere. If they pass, then they can become part of UB because they have taken care of their defficiencies.

JB Samba

Mr. Charles, to put it simply, you have noy understood what the arguement is all about. The english language requirement for those studying in the diaspora is either TOEFL, IELTS ...(a level play ground for everybody). Mark you that in America or the UK there is no English Language subject pass is a prerequisite to University studies.
You should also note that Cameroonians (francophones and anglophones alike) are not native English language speakers and thus should be treated as such.
You talk of tougher English langauge requirements for Anglophones. What do you have to say about francophones and Equatoguineans who are presently studying at UB and can't follow lectures properly because of english langauge barrier (they did pass the comprehensive english language exam that UB offers) meanwhile there are Angophones suffering in Francophone Universities with a better understanding of the english langauge. There will come a time (with the marginalisation of Anglophones in every setup in Cmaeroon) when Anglophones will be barred from Francophone Universities because the don't have a pass in French langauge. When that time finally comes where do you think they will go to.
As Mr Ambe has rightly put it "if UB authorities believe that a 2-month crash course is enough for Francophones (an xtension Equatoguineans) to cope with the language demands at the university, then the same should apply to Anglophones. So let's level the playing field and have all those who do not meet the standard (anglophone or francophone or foreign nationals)to go through the crash course and take the required tests. If they fail, they go elsewhere. If they pass, then they can become part of UB because they have taken care of their defficiencies.

Ebai George

Thank you Barrister Ajong for the continued efforts.I wasn't too surprise to read that you are the one because I know who you are.As one of the students tear gased during the fight for reforms,I know the mouth that have teasted the teast of milk will never forget how it teasted.
More grease to your elbow,for when a mango is due to ripe even when put in a deep freezer it will still get ripe.Bravo !!!

Ebai George

Thank you Barrister Ajong for the continued efforts.I wasn't too surprise to read that you are the one because I know who you are.As one of the students tear gased during the fight for reforms,I know the mouth that have teasted the teast of milk will never forget how it teasted.
More grease to your elbow,for when a mango is due to ripe even when put in a deep freezer it will still get ripe.Bravo !!!

The Writer (righter) of wrongs

I think Charles has said it all. The lawyer has no case. If he were not good at English when he was a student I am not sure he would have been where he is today. Although we must admit that the use of English as a language of instruction for children for whom English is not the first language is prejudicial, we must recognise that it is like learning one's own mother tongue and it is a life challenge that they must indulge in since it prefigures their future. With regard to whether Francophones are more proficient in English than the Anglophones,I should point out that the little knowledge that I have of both educational systems indicates that Francophones do English from Form One (sixième) to Upper Sixth ( Terminale) and it is compulsory for all students, irrespective of their specialisation in High School.The English programme is mostly on English Language and Usage and they have at least three hours of it weekly. Not excluding the fact that some of them start with English at the primary level and that there has been a tremendous move on their part to learn English in order to grasp the opportunities that proficiency in this language now provides. That's why if you go to the British Councils, the American Language Centre, the Bilingual Training Centres during the long vacation you will meet a good number of Francophone children there learning English. The Anglophone English curriculum virtually ends in Form Five and for students who are not doing the Arts, they part with the teaching of English in Form five.In some schools, there has be a struggle to implement General English for non-Arts students but they most often ignore the course and discourage the teacher. It is not surprising thus that English 101/102 is the most dreaded course for some of the UB students who have not developed some familiarities with Shakespeare's, language.The influence of Pidgin English is also not negligible. To the best of my knowledge the UB English summer course excludes nobody. The lawyer should refocus his claims or else he might be an advocate of the culture of mediocrity or has concealed intents.

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