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Friday, 10 March 2006

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rexon

I agree with most issues cited by the author. however, i think he has generalised the very corrupt actions of citizens of la republique du cameroun and their poor mannagerial skills to reflect even southern cameroonians. The author should have specified that the republic of southern cameroons has the ability to govern itself with a proper democracy. Our culture, values and way of life has been destroyed by the francophonie way of life that is geared towards corruption, bribery, theft of state properties, etc. The author fails to understand that this vices have been imported to the southern cameroons only by french agents like sous prefets, gerndarmes, etc.

Nalo P

Rexon,

Whatever West Cameroon may have been, the fact is that as we speak, corruption is a generalized malaise in Anglophone and Francophone Cameroon. We can advance whatever reason we want for this situation but that IS the situation. So spare us the drivel about SDOs and Gendarmes.

BTW, the problem is not that there was no corruption in West Cameroon. Far from it! the Powercam and Cameroon Bank scandals of the late sixties prove this point. The problem is that back then, there were mechanisms to restrain and punish corrupt individuals who exist in every society. One more time LA Republique does not have the monopoly of corruption and vice neither does West Cameroon have a monopoly of Virtue.

Ma Mary

Corruption exists in every society, but the historical record shows that the Southern Cameroons or West Cameroon used independent judicial mechanisms for dealing with corruption. The commissions that investigated and punished corruption were truly independent of the executive. That is not true of la Republique du Cameroon.

Corruption was also something of shame. Open bribery was not possible, because it was a thing of shame and dishonour. We also had sting operations to trap habitual bribe takers. La Republique refuses to use sting operations to catch corrupt people. The difference between our approaches to this societal ill was like night and day.

Fritzane Kiki HK

Individuals are the engine that makes a healthy local economy grow. It is individuals, working independently and collectively, that form the fabric of community life. It is the skills, abilities, and experience of these individuals that can be mobilized to develop a vibrant local economy.This is not the case in Cameroon.Little doubt why they can't follow a favorable policy that will lead us to a healthy economic growth.

Economic growth is the ultimate objective of much public policy, and that in turn because it is economic growth which gives us choices, the ability to enjoy better quality housing, the ability to have better health care, the option of choosing more leisure, the ability to invest in environmentally-friendly production techniques, the freedom to choose between an array of options denied to those where economic growth is low or non-existent.

But in Cameroon there is no good environment for investing your capital.The corrupt La Republique stooges will only embezzle state funds into their private coffers and levy high taxes to small and medium size enterprises.

So today if we want to discuss the issue of economic growth in the broadest terms we should aim at providing a framework for thinking about what is a reasonable expectation for Cameroon's growth, to identify some of the factors that will determine whether we are able to achieve that potential, and to discuss the linkage between growth and other investment interest.

Sick and tired of being sick and tired of the state of affairs lol....I reserve my comments....

Fritzane Kiki
Hong Kong

Funwi Joshua

I wish to chip in something on this issue coz it has to do with development; a domain in which I intend to professionalise, from the direction of Resource Management.
We all know that Cameroon is sick and concerned Cameroonians spare their time to carry out findings and make contributions to the different topics raised in these columns so that the policy makers, in the course of reading through (if at all they do), may pick vital points to constitute their decisions for the development and advancement of our fatherland.
I have lived and even worked with Cameroonians of Francophone and Anglophone origins, both back home and here abroad. I will like to remark without any bias that the francophone Cameroonian is a carefree somebody who doesn't give a damn to the consequences of his actions, so long as he achieves his personal interest(s). The Anglophone Cameroonian copied this only later, when he discovered that his continuous "goody goody", was not appreciated and he seemed to be the loser all the time.
My father used to tell me stories of the West Cameroonian Police of old and discipline as well as respect within administrative ranks. A set up where law breakers were subjected to punishment proportional to their crimes. These, really, were nice stories to listen to and today, it all seems to be a different country in its entirety. The poor are bound to get poorer coz the little they have is taken away in the form of bribe (think of our ENS annexe graduates) and they end up getting just a fraction of what they deserve as salary ; the poor are the last to be served in all circumstances.
Has anyone ever gone to pay just the simple electricity bills? It is normal to stand in the cue and someone packs his car, by-passes the cue, goes in and pays his bill and those of other family members of his, while u have been standing under the sun for countless hours, only to approach the cashier and the window is shot with a notice indicating closed.
Compare this to a situation in the Belgian Embassy in Yaounde, where a 3 star uniform officer, manipulates at the gate and finds himself inside, moves up to the window and the receptionist tells him: " Sir, I'm sorry, I don't know u coz u didn't book an appointment besides not being on the line".
When shall we learn to serve everyone equally, irrespective of position or money? How do we feel, when we go for a service here in the West and the same service back home? One can be done in a few mnutes and the other takes weeks, if not months. My Belgian Professor does not need to be in a suit and drive a big car, all that count are his publications and works; you may not necessarily call him professor even.
In the University of Buea, a professor sent out a student for addressing him, "Sir", instead of professor. Cameroonian professors don't publish nor do any research, they go to tell lies on politcal campaign podiums, abandoning the students to the mery of God and in turn, they are rewarded administrative and political positions. Government offices open at 10:30am instead of 8:oo am, right in the nation's capital (I faced this when I went to buy fiscal stamps at the treasury near the Univ of Y'de 1). People are on seat for 3 hours instead of 8 hours per day and they go away with it. No one serves you as though he/she loves the job; it's always with a frown and some harsh words as cadeau, call it a present, if u want. Public offices have no data bank, no records/statistics of their activities, book-keeping is still via the analogue system despite the fact that computers are donnated to ministries almost on a daily basis.
Where then is the development going to come from? From the laxed and carefree service providers with no one to check, let alone talk of imposing sanctions?
I end my contribution with one question: Can federalism (call it decentralisation) be a means to achieve effective control of our resources and enhance development? Political analysts, pls, help me out here!

Funwi Joshua

I wish to chip in something on this issue coz it has to do with development; a domain in which I intend to professionalise, from the direction of Resource Management.
We all know that Cameroon is sick and concerned Cameroonians spare their time to carry out findings and make contributions to the different topics raised in these columns so that the policy makers, in the course of reading through (if at all they do), may pick vital points to constitute their decisions for the development and advancement of our fatherland.
I have lived and even worked with Cameroonians of Francophone and Anglophone origins, both back home and here abroad. I will like to remark without any bias that the francophone Cameroonian is a carefree somebody who doesn't give a damn to the consequences of his actions, so long as he achieves his personal interest(s). The Anglophone Cameroonian copied this only later, when he discovered that his continuous "goody goody", was not appreciated and he seemed to be the loser all the time.
My father used to tell me stories of the West Cameroonian Police of old and discipline as well as respect within administrative ranks. A set up where law breakers were subjected to punishment proportional to their crimes. These, really, were nice stories to listen to and today, it all seems to be a different country in its entirety. The poor are bound to get poorer coz the little they have is taken away in the form of bribe (think of our ENS annexe graduates) and they end up getting just a fraction of what they deserve as salary ; the poor are the last to be served in all circumstances.
Has anyone ever gone to pay just the simple electricity bills? It is normal to stand in the cue and someone packs his car, by-passes the cue, goes in and pays his bill and those of other family members of his, while u have been standing under the sun for countless hours, only to approach the cashier and the window is shot with a notice indicating closed.
Compare this to a situation in the Belgian Embassy in Yaounde, where a 3 star uniform officer, manipulates at the gate and finds himself inside, moves up to the window and the receptionist tells him: " Sir, I'm sorry, I don't know u coz u didn't book an appointment besides not being on the line".
When shall we learn to serve everyone equally, irrespective of position or money? How do we feel, when we go for a service here in the West and the same service back home? One can be done in a few mnutes and the other takes weeks, if not months. My Belgian Professor does not need to be in a suit and drive a big car, all that count are his publications and works; you may not necessarily call him professor even.
In the University of Buea, a professor sent out a student for addressing him, "Sir", instead of professor. Cameroonian professors don't publish nor do any research, they go to tell lies on politcal campaign podiums, abandoning the students to the mery of God and in turn, they are rewarded administrative and political positions. Government offices open at 10:30am instead of 8:oo am, right in the nation's capital (I faced this when I went to buy fiscal stamps at the treasury near the Univ of Y'de 1). People are on seat for 3 hours instead of 8 hours per day and they go away with it. No one serves you as though he/she loves the job; it's always with a frown and some harsh words as cadeau, call it a present, if u want. Public offices have no data bank, no records/statistics of their activities, book-keeping is still via the analogue system despite the fact that computers are donnated to ministries almost on a daily basis.
Where then is the development going to come from? From the laxed and carefree service providers with no one to check, let alone talk of imposing sanctions?
I end my contribution with one question: Can federalism (call it decentralisation) be a means to achieve effective control of our resources and enhance development? Political analysts, pls, help me out here!

rexon

Hello Joshua,
I wish to answer your last question posted. I think the only way to end the current trend of affairs happening in the southern cameroons is full independence. constitutionally, we have been colonised illegally by la republique francaise du cameroun. We need our full independence to manage our affairs independently, so i think that is what matters to us most. So i will advise you to throw your efforts towards appraising the work of the current SCNC Leadership in building a sound future for your children.

Ma Mary

Joshua - Decentralization as they call it will not work. These frogs will not relinquish control as long as there are resources to be milked, people to be exploited. The only thing to do is a long hot shower, with a strong kucha and disinfectant soap to remove all traces of frog. And don't forget to brush your teeth as well.

Roland Ngong

This reminds me of some incident this year - 2006 - when I raised the issue of red tape with a distinguished civil servant in Cameroon. I was told with a straight face (no blinking!!)that it takes 300 days on the average to secure a permit to open a bakery in Egypt (UN Human Development Report 2005).It sometimes would actually take two years.
I did not believe this until I read the UN Report. Can you really believe it - just to open a bakery (to bake bread not to produce a weapon of mass destruction)? God forbid!!
Why is anyone complaining? Cameroon is not doing that bad - and I am not trying to be or to sound cynical.

julius

Here is another reason why Cameroon is poor.
I found this article in the Washingtonpost about french corruption in Africa, although the country written about is Congo, you can easily subsitute Congo for Cameroon. If anyone is interested, here is a link to the article. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/12/AR2006031201109.html

Julius

Funwi Joshua

May I start by making a spelling correction that I committed last time: "queue, not cue".
Commenting on the publication by the Washington Post, I will like to know if the World Bank and the IMF consist of French staff only. If not, what was the opinion of the other staff members from the other Western Nations on the cancellation of Congo Braza's debts vis à vis Congo's position to that of the other heaily indebted countries?
This is an indication that the West is not playing any fair game on Africa. I, as an individual, am not convinced that any Western Country can grant help to Africa with no strings attached. If the so called aid were genuine, the West would not only encourage production in the primary sector but would go ahead to train us on processing our primary products into finished goods. This, they haven't done coz they want to maintain a sure market for their own products. I see the so called aid as a weapon to help the big nations acquire what they spot as useful to them in the developing countries. Where do our corrupt leaders bank all their booties? Recently, gunmen made away with the sum of 50 million pounds from a financial institution in the UK and there was a comment over the BBC that the money can only be hidden in a developping country where banks accept money without questioning the source. Do the Western banks question the sources of the money they get from their African customers. If so, how many of these Cameroonian ministers and directors have ever been reported and the money put back into the Cameroonian treasury? Is this money not in foreign accounts? Why did the French bank, in the Washington Post, not question all these illegal deals from Congo Braza's oil sales?
We need more processing industries in Cameroon and a more computerised system of management. We are tired of paying high charges on simple goods whose origin, if traced, points back to Cameroon. An inventory of our natural resources does not even permit us to be seeking foreign aid. If our leaders are unwilling to adopt a management strategy that exposes embezzlers to punitive measures, simply because they also have skeletons in their cupboards, then it is high time we began to think of how to approach this monster of human induced poverty. It is a shame that we cannot even assign a value to what we have; sell a tea estate and the buyer takes two weeks to recover the cost!

Funwi Joshua

Roland, May I ask u this question. While in school, do u compete with the bright ones or with the dull ones? I think we are advocating progress and not regression.

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