Bloggers' Club

  • If you write well in English and have strong opinions please CLICK HERE to blog at Up Station Mountain Club.

Search this Site

March 2021

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Jimbi Media Sites

  • AFRICAphonie
    AFRICAphonie is a Pan African Association which operates on the premise that AFRICA can only be what AFRICANS and their friends want AFRICA to be.
  • Jacob Nguni
    Virtuoso guitarist, writer and humorist. Former lead guitarist of Rocafil, led by Prince Nico Mbarga.
  • Postwatch Magazine
    A UMI (United Media Incorporated) publication. Specializing in well researched investigative reports, it focuses on the Cameroonian scene, particular issues of interest to the former British Southern Cameroons.
  • Bernard Fonlon
    Dr Bernard Fonlon was an extraordinary figure who left a large footprint in Cameroonian intellectual, social and political life.
  • George Ngwane: Public Intellectual
    George Ngwane is a prominent author, activist and intellectual.
  • PostNewsLine
    PostNewsLine is an interactive feature of 'The Post', an important newspaper published out of Buea, Cameroons.
  • France Watcher
    Purpose of this advocacy site: To aggregate all available information about French terror, exploitation and manipulation of Africa
  • Bakwerirama
    Spotlight on the Bakweri Society and Culture. The Bakweri are an indigenous African nation.
  • Simon Mol
    Cameroonian poet, writer, journalist and Human Rights activist living in Warsaw, Poland
  • Bate Besong
    Bate Besong, award-winning firebrand poet and playwright.
  • Fonlon-Nichols Award
    Website of the Literary Award established to honor the memory of BERNARD FONLON, the great Cameroonian teacher, writer, poet, and philosopher, who passionately defended human rights in an often oppressive political atmosphere.
  • Scribbles from the Den
    The award-winning blog of Dibussi Tande, Cameroon's leading blogger.
  • Omoigui.com
    Professor of Medicine and interventional cardiologist, Nowa Omoigui is also one of the foremost experts and scholars on the history of the Nigerian Military and the Nigerian Civil War. This site contains many of his writings and comments on military subjects and history.
  • Victor Mbarika ICT Weblog
    Victor Wacham Agwe Mbarika is one of Africa's foremost experts on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Dr. Mbarika's research interests are in the areas of information infrastructure diffusion in developing countries and multimedia learning.
  • Martin Jumbam
    The refreshingly, unique, incisive and generally hilarous writings about the foibles of African society and politics by former Cameroon Life Magazine columnist Martin Jumbam.
  • Enanga's POV
    Rosemary Ekosso, a Cameroonian novelist and blogger who lives and works in Cambodia.
  • Godfrey Tangwa aka Rotcod Gobata
    Renaissance man, philosophy professor, actor and newspaper columnist, Godfrey Tangwa aka Rotcod Gobata touches a wide array of subjects. Always entertaining and eminently readable. Visit for frequent updates.
  • Francis Nyamnjoh
    Francis B. Nyamnjoh is Associate Professor and Head of Publications and Dissemination with the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA).
  • Ilongo Sphere
    Novelist and poet Ilongo Fritz Ngalle, long concealed his artist's wings behind the firm exterior of a University administrator and guidance counsellor. No longer. Enjoy his unique poems and glimpses of upcoming novels and short stories.

  • Up Station Mountain Club
    A no holds barred group blog for all things Cameroonian. "Man no run!"
Start Geesee CHAT
Start Geesee CHAT

Up Station Mountain Club Newsfeed


Conception & Design


  • Jimbi Media

  • domainad1

« To Save The SDF:Tamanjong Wants Muna's Ambition Halted | Main | Kupe Muanenguba Exhorted To Support Ngolle Ngolle »

Thursday, 28 September 2006

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Ndiks

The poverty current is very high now and people semm to have been galvanized by it? Have people been push to the wall by the Colonial junta in Yaounde,lead by a basilisk called Biya?And their IMF/World Bank Inspectors who engineered this neo-liberal Economic boondoggle?Hello,you mean business now.Before i share a quote with ye,You Civil society must first torch the offices of these Darwinist Bulldogs and adherents of Malthus (IMF/World Bank)That is the nerve Centre of the whole Miasma. Read this piece on :

Dancing on the electric grid
By Per Fagereng
Picture this standard experiment in psychology: A group
of rats is placed on an electric grid and the voltage is slowly
increased. After a while the rats feel a burning tingle in
their feet. The experimenters up the voltage some more, and watch
the rats dance and bite each other.
The experimenters are seeking knowledge, and the rats'
pain is presumably worth it. The experimenters don't blame the
rats for fighting each other, or punish the more aggressive ones.
They know that individuals react to pain in different ways.
Now picture the economic terrain as a different kind of
pain grid. Instead of electric shocks, the inhabitants experience
job loss, higher prices, less pay, overwork, polluted
neighborhoods and so on. Controlling the grid are not
psychologists, but CEOs and bankers. Instead of knowledge,
they are seeking profit. And so they up the pain, but not
because they want to hurt people. They are really trying to up
their profits, and the pain is a side effect.
After a while people on the grid do nasty things to
each other, everything from domestic violence to immigrant-bashing
to crime. Unlike the rats, the people get blamed for their
misbehavior. We are told to point our fingers at the victims
on the grid, instead of at the economic rulers who keep
increasing the pain.
You'd think that the CEOs and bankers would ease up on
the pain, but think again. They continue to demand more
sacrifice from the poor, knowing full well how they'll react.
Would you call this a big conspiracy? Or the sum of
many small conspiracies? Maybe it doesn't matter that much. I'm
not a mind reader. The point is, the economic rulers pursue
their profits and they know the consequences. So to that extent,
they are choosing to inflict pain.

www.killinghope.org

Ndiks

The poverty current is very high now and people semm to have been galvanized by it? Have people been push to the wall by the Colonial junta in Yaounde,lead by a basilisk called Biya?And their IMF/World Bank Inspectors who engineered this neo-liberal Economic boondoggle?Hello,you mean business now.Before i share a quote with ye,You Civil society must first torch the offices of these Darwinist Bulldogs and adherents of Malthus (IMF/World Bank)That is the nerve Centre of the whole Miasma. Read this piece on :

Dancing on the electric grid
By Per Fagereng
Picture this standard experiment in psychology: A group
of rats is placed on an electric grid and the voltage is slowly
increased. After a while the rats feel a burning tingle in
their feet. The experimenters up the voltage some more, and watch
the rats dance and bite each other.
The experimenters are seeking knowledge, and the rats'
pain is presumably worth it. The experimenters don't blame the
rats for fighting each other, or punish the more aggressive ones.
They know that individuals react to pain in different ways.
Now picture the economic terrain as a different kind of
pain grid. Instead of electric shocks, the inhabitants experience
job loss, higher prices, less pay, overwork, polluted
neighborhoods and so on. Controlling the grid are not
psychologists, but CEOs and bankers. Instead of knowledge,
they are seeking profit. And so they up the pain, but not
because they want to hurt people. They are really trying to up
their profits, and the pain is a side effect.
After a while people on the grid do nasty things to
each other, everything from domestic violence to immigrant-bashing
to crime. Unlike the rats, the people get blamed for their
misbehavior. We are told to point our fingers at the victims
on the grid, instead of at the economic rulers who keep
increasing the pain.
You'd think that the CEOs and bankers would ease up on
the pain, but think again. They continue to demand more
sacrifice from the poor, knowing full well how they'll react.
Would you call this a big conspiracy? Or the sum of
many small conspiracies? Maybe it doesn't matter that much. I'm
not a mind reader. The point is, the economic rulers pursue
their profits and they know the consequences. So to that extent,
they are choosing to inflict pain.

www.killinghope.org

Tekum Mbeng

Sadly but understandably, salaries cannot be reinstated to pre-1993 levels. No political economy like Cameroon's can buck the market. There simply isn't the hard currency available to backup an expansion of the FCFA in circulation, to absorb a huge salary raise.

Worst still, in the absence of domestic production, an increase in salaries would only suck imports into the country and at the expense of further hard currency expenditure.

The quickest route out of poverty is to put a responsible leader in Yaounde. The tired politicians, relics of the last century, now have their best days behind them.

Tombele

The Post should take a lead in making sure that English is not bastardized. It is the most popular language in the world let's use it to our advantage. This word "sensatisation" I believe should be awareness. The French use "pour sensibiler" should be to make aware. They are numerous other examples, chief of service,chief of centre, government delegate, delegation of education. Any of these expressions in Ghana,Nigeria,Canada,USA,Australia,England will make people scratch their heads. I remember when we wrote the GCE from London and some of us even did better than british kids. I know the pressure from the francophones, but they are dictionnaries. Let's keep up the good English this could land us some industrial and call centre jobs from entrepeneurs.

Fon

The strike action seems to be a futile one at the level of planning.Why only for three days? Or they are sure the government will heed to their plight just within three days?They should plan for an indefinite strike untill their grievances are redressed?

This can be an opportunity to bring down the dictator.Cameroonians must learn to fight for their rights rather than continue to die in silence.

Njifenzt

This is a very powerful and effective move to reach out for a final solution to the main problems facing Cameroonians.The organisers have to assess the impact of this strike action within five days as planned,if the damage is not good enough to bring down the system ,they should intensify their campaign and rearrange their whole tactics for a final one that will stagnate everything.
It is important for Cameroon to have a fresh start.Certainly things need to be forced to disintergrate so we can start building again.Paul Biya and his entire gov't is doomed in every aspect of political and economic life.It is hope that these guys donot give up the fight to reach their goal.Let everything collapse.Again its likely some enlightened and dynamic guys would step in to put things correctly.
Good luck in this very powerful action.

Maishu

Tombele is right to an extent. Any good translator - or linguist for that matter -will tell you that language always operates in a context. "Sensibiliser" in French could indeed mean "to create awareness"; it could also mean "to educate", "to sensitise", to conscientise". It all depends on the context.

my quarrel is with English - both spoken and written - in Cameroon. A few examples suffice: "he was installed in his new functions" actually means "he assumed office"; "the concours has been launched" is the competitive examination has been advertised".Prizes are "awarded" not "attributed". Examples abound.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Google




AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Mobilise this Blog
Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported