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Friday, 10 June 2011

Comments

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J. S. Dinga

So what actually takes a newsman to Lebialem? And what is it that keeps the diehard residents from responding to rural exodus like the rest? What about the other route that was/is supposed to link Lebialem to the rest of the South-West Province? What are the prospects for an airport construction? Is it not possible that below those gorgeous hills lies some undiscovered natural resource that may change the face of Lebialem and attract investors swarming in?

This is a strange way to appreciate a journalist's effort to bring to our readership a hidden treasure of Cameroon. Look at those hills!
The people of Lebialem are known to be very dynamic and reputed to be in the forefront of the development of other towns in the South-West, notably Kumba, Buea, Tiko and Victoria. What is their plan for good old home? And what is the government's plan for development in that area? Should Lebialem not be a bread basket, given its rich cultivable lands? Surely there must be some hidden treaure that can attract more human beings out there!

Finally, the one million franc question: What took The Post reporter to that remote part of the country?

atabong albert

Lebialem is not the last place..over 50% of cameroon rural area is like Lebialem...The reporter like most journalists who travel very remote areas or border areas are quite to conclude that, " the people live as if they are in Nigeria" Please they live in cameroon and they are cameroonians. to the best of my knowledge there is no local Government Council In nIgeria except the defunct Bakassi Local Government area that is not accessible by clean and well constructed bitumen road..The Obudu area is even worst in terms of rugged topography than Lebialem but it has been transformed into a world class cattle ranch which attracts million of tourist all over the world. we simple have a Govt that has refused to think of of its people.. the question l want to ask.. had the lebialem people voted for reunification with Nigeria, do we think our plight could have been the same after 50 years?

Amouta Denis

I have said this often: That Cameroon has so much to offer for Cameroon Post journalists to write about, and this article is just one of them. Travel to these villages, local markets, etc and you would find interesting stuff to write about, not the Forjindam stuff, cpdm, sdf and biya.

Jimmy

Sir , ur article looks interesting, but unfortunately Lebialem does not share boundary with nigeria, it is right in Cameroon, that is between Manyu and Dschang. Anyway i enjoyed reading ur tour of lebialem, hope we have more from other parts of cameroon

J. S. Dinga

Aha! Now that we all agree on one thing - that the journalist Azore Opio did the right thing by focusing a needed searchlight on this sleeping giant- how many will like to join me in giving the gentleman a much needed bottle of 33 export for his effort? Stand up and be counted!

china boy

Good article,it is not only lebialem that is like that,most villages are like that abandonned by its own gov,t.no roads,hospital and other amenities.i pray that we stay with this kind of articles so that we should know what is really going on in our great country.Besides politics there are so much that we can do for our country.Popo and his freinds have forgotten about our beloved country.all they do is shuttling all over europe.europe that has been developed by its leaders.why can,t our own leaders develop our own land and enjoy it here at home?visit Fotouni a self reliant village in the west province.

Positive Change

Who will believe such fairy tales that there are naked children in Lebialem everywhere as caterogiaclly stated by the writer? It makes me think of people in the Amazon Forest who have never had contacts with the rest of the world.

The writer makes mention of Mary Health Hospital but fails to acknowledge that there is no hospital in the whole of Southwest region equal to that hospital.

The writer slept in Menji and does not mention of sprawling construction works there. He describes the place as scanty; a pure figment of his imagination.

He says in conditional tense that Lisbon is the only rest house in the capital city. Put putting it in the conditional implies that he did not bother to find out if there are many more, and yes there are. Hence, i consider that declaration a sweeping statement. Are night clubs any barometer for measuring how developed a place is?

The writer could not receive CRTV signals, may be TV. YES. But in several parts of Lebialem including some parts of Menji signals of the National Radio, Poala FM in Baffousam, Radio Batcham, Radio Star Baffousam, CRTV West, CRTV Bamenda and a few other radio stations in Ikwa Ibom Nigeria are received. He might have been overwhelmed to capture a Nigerian radio signal, may be for the first time and decided to focus on it.

The writer was in Wabane but fails to find out that food production in the area is abundant and the people just as in other parts of Lebialem, need to be assisted in road construction. I do not know what he saw in Alou. The main issue in Lebialem are the bad roads. It is at this level that that i think government must do more. ROADS.

He totally ignores the landscape and vegetation in this part of the world which is a source of attraction to many and even tourists, yet he is writing about Lebialem.

He says there are no banks, that is true to a greater extent but Menji Cooperative credit Union is among the best performing CAMCUL related micro finance in the country. May be Menji Cooperative credit Union should should take the challenge and seek to begin paying salaries of civil servants so that people do not go to the west province for such services again.

It is really funny when the writer says one should buy everything even bottles of mineral water before embarking on a journey to Lebialem. This is really condescending statement. On the contrary, Lebialem has supermarkets which sell certain items even cheaper than some places in town.

May be the writer should say he did not see people drinking and getting drunk, something common with reporters of a certain media in Cameroon. That would have made the place to look more lively in his eyes.

The writer was in Lebialem and wanted to write about Lebialem but neither did he bother to find out about Lebialem: the place, the people, their culture, their story. How many fondoms of the 17 Fondoms in Lebialem did the writer visit? He is contented with hasty observations to make generalized loose statements to the total discredit and mockery of Lebialem.

Had the reporter been fed, lodged and even given some "tips", what is usually called gombo in the local journalism parlance in Cameroon, he would have written something else. Some of what he has written is true but in its entirety, the article is a gloss over.

Akem

Agendia, you're being a spoilspot here! If there are gaps in the reporter' story, which is to be expected after a brief stay in ANY area in the world, simply fill these gaps for us instead of launching into unecessary attacks. Massa, this one no be Gbagbo-Outarra!!!

The bottom line is the Lebialem, like many parts of Cameroon, is a little corner of the world that time - and the Biya regime - forgot; a leap back into the 19th century. I have lived there and I know what I am talking about. So please, take a chill pill or write about the "other" Lebialem which the writer did not write about because he was not given tips (what arrogance from you!!!)

J. S. Dinga

Dear Mr Akem, thank you immensely for saying that. Unless and until Cameroonians learn to move away from this distressing propensity of always picking quarrels with what others do or say, we cannot move one step ahead. Surely the journalist could not possibly say all in one write-up; it is up to the rest of us to fill the blanks and there are so many blanks to fill instead of wasting precious energy and time condemning a genuine attempt at something. Let us look on the bright side.

Nkem Richard

Pure crap!!!. Primary school journalism.

Dasa emmanuel

Nkem Richard:
Like most Cameroonians, who have nothing to offer when it comes to writing, descripting the pains-taking efforts of an individual who wants to enlighten others about some areas of Cameroon as "pure crap", speaks volumes about you. Show our readers in this forum anything of scholarship that you have written. Behind these trappings of modern technology called "computers", we've resorted to all sorts of insults on fellow Cameroonians, and such reactions would take us anywhere.
What's interesting about the comments that have been labelled against this journalist who wrote this article is the fact that those spewing this nonsense against him, appear to be natives of Lebialem itself. Men like Agendia (Positive Change), Nkem Richard and others, whose writings in this forum, leave much to desired. As natives of the area, who bask themselves in this negative culture of yellow jounalism, they suddenly became surprised that someone else could get into their area and do some investigative work that they, "proud sons of that area" they would want others to beleive, couldn't do it themselves, even though they called themselves writers.
You know what the challenge is: FOR YOU GUYS CHALLENGING THIS JOURNALIST, PLEASE COME OUT WITH A MORE BRILLIANT ARTICLE ABOUT LEBIALEM AND IT MAY SETTLE THIS NEGATIVITY FROM YOU ALL! THANKS

Dasa emmanuel

Nkem Richard:
Like most Cameroonians, who have nothing to offer when it comes to writing, descripting the pains-taking efforts of an individual who wants to enlighten others about some areas of Cameroon as "pure crap", speaks volumes about you. Show our readers in this forum anything of scholarship that you have written. Behind these trappings of modern technology called "computers", we've resorted to all sorts of insults on fellow Cameroonians, and such reactions would take us NO WHERE.
What's interesting about the comments that have been labelled against this journalist who wrote this article is the fact that those spewing this nonsense against him, appear to be natives of Lebialem itself. Men like Agendia (Positive Change), Nkem Richard and others, whose writings in this forum, leave much to desired. As natives of the area, who bask themselves in this negative culture of yellow jounalism, they suddenly became surprised that someone else could get into their area and do some investigative work that they, "proud sons of that area" they would want others to beleive, couldn't do it themselves, even though they called themselves writers.
You know what the challenge is: FOR YOU GUYS CHALLENGING THIS JOURNALIST, PLEASE COME OUT WITH A MORE BRILLIANT ARTICLE ABOUT LEBIALEM AND IT MAY SETTLE THIS NEGATIVITY FROM YOU ALL! THANKS

Ernest

Very predictable... only a Nkem and an Agendia would finid the article pure crap. Someone said earlier that time and the Biya government had left Lebialem behind. I would add the "elite" who would rather bury their heads in the sand and pretend that their little "heart of darkness" is paris or new york in terms of development...

Poor Lebialem, your children want to hide your dirty little secret of underdevelopment, backwardness and abandonment...

limbekid

I`ve never been to Lebialem but this is as vivid as it gets.

Rather disappointing that some Lebialem "elite" consider it a personal insult. Common people it`s only a travelogue, you should feel priviledged.

John Dinga

Dear friends and congeners, two wrongs never make a right. Let us call this digression a bad cloud sweeping over our skies. Let us turn instead to something more uplifting. I feel very strongly that this journalist's write-up could be the eye opener needed to redirect our thinking, our energies and action.

I still keep thinking that out of Lebialem's dark cloud, one should find a silver lining. Just look at the fantastic landscape on that photograph. In these days when foreign investors are looking for little niches here and there, it seems to me sharing ideas about such things can go a long way to excite someone's imagination and eventually act as the nucleus around which Lebialem can then wake up like a sleeping giant. Look at what foreign companies are doing in once neglected farmlands in Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Tanzania, exploiting large stretches to grow corn, sugar cane and other crops for food and biofuels. Is it too far-fetched to ruminate over a similar scenario for Lebialem?

Nkem Richard

Thanks Mr Dasa Emanuel & Ernest,

Next time you don't need to post your comments twice or write in upper and lower cases to show what you can offer in terms of writing.
You seem to be more concern with the name "Nkem" than the comments made. Also these comments were never directed to you but to the author. For your information, I am not one of those idiots with a keypad and an internet connection. You can continue to throw your venoms but you will never read any thing similar from me again.

Cheers bros and just mind you business next time.

Peter

Any reasonable, leave alone the word Intelligent journalist would do a bit of investigations prior to a visit rather than set off with preconceived negative ideas. A class seven kid would have done a better article. Opio should seriously reconsider his idea of reporting. I think he'd fail to decribe his own house reasonably!

Alem

Nice presentation but do not make your conclusion about Lebialem based on the remotest part of it. For example when you say the division is flooded by naked children it is wrong. That not withstanding its a good piece of writing. I appreciate it!

Iza Adam

Interesting that Mr. Journalist was able to pick up a rich destination for his report. Did he do well in his presentation? I wonder. I wonder because I feel the report lacks credible information about Lebialem Division and its people. It looks like another piece of bench journalism, after what seems to me that he read some folk tales and wrote a write-up. You should be better than that. I come from the North West Province but I have spent time in some parts of Lebialem Division and it has electricity, restaurants, night clubs, good educational institutions, and children are not cluthered; so I beleive it would have done you more favour if you were objective, balance and not biased or myopic in your views/report. You would have been awesome if you said the Lebialem People live on Tree Tops and Wear Backs of Trees for cloths, as people before you have often joked about. You need insight to write about one's land, I suggest you get the insight and also get your writing skills in check.

Taku

I will like to know what motivated this writer to write about Lebialem. What positive views he got from Lebialem. Did he make a comparison with other divisions in the south west such as Indian, Kupe Maniguba, Manyu, Meme and Fako to come up with a general conclusion. He mentionned Fako but failed to compare the level of exposure and institution between the two. Did he compare at the national level the literacy rate in Lebialem to make a judgement? As someone mentioned, a Lebialem man is very hardworking and has no time drinking carelessly. The topography of Lebialem maybe unberable to the writer, but it is still more accessible than may remote areas in Cameroon thanks to the effort of Lebialem people who have constructed their own roads. Finally, I thank the writer for thinking of Lebialem. I am sure something must had motivated him to find out about a very hardworking and proud people.

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